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for fitting us in. >>> and more on the disaster in japan straight ahead on "the daily rundown" with chuck and savannah, right now. >>> overnight, japan is reeling after the largest earthquake in its recorded history. it now pushes a tsunami across its shores and reports of several hundred are killed as the water sweeps away ships, vehicles, buildings, sparking fires, devastating coastal communities, and even threatening some nuclear plants over there. meanwhile, on this side of the pacific, waves are blanketing things, it's hitting hawaii this past hour and the west coast is now bracing for an impact later this morning. we have live reports. and we're going to hear from fema director right here ondale rundo daily rundown. >> let's get to the rundown. we will start with the breaking news out of japan. a catastrophic 8.9 earthquake in japan today. the largest earthquake in japan's recorded history. the latest death poll, the ap is reporting japanese police saying 200 to 300 bodies have been found in the northeastern coastal area. the quake sent tsunami waves barreling across the pacific, co
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
, good night, america. captioned by closed captioning services, inc >> bret: japan deals with environmental crisis following the earthquake and tsunami. will potential nuclear disaster there affect growing reliance for energy over here? and republican leaders try to keep the members in line long enough to avoid a government shutdown. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." i'm bret baier. japan is coping with multiple disasters tonight. the japanese prime minister says if the catastrophe unseen since the end of world war ii. millions of people have little or no food, water, or heat in the freezing temperatures. following friday's earthquake and tsunami. nearly 1900 are confirmed dead but estimates for a final tally run much higher, with thousands more missing. explosions and exposed fuel rods at nuclear facilities heightened fear of full-scale meltdown. correspondent adam housley is in japan tonight. >> fears of a worst case scenario grip a nation that's shaken and battered from friday's 9.0 earthquake, subsequent tsunami and continual aftershocks. n
's happening in japan. >> thank you, mr. president. i have two question. on the tragedy in japan. so you already touched on the issue in your opening statement but i'd like to ask about your personal feeling on the situation. you went to japan last year. now, tsunami hit coast of japan and waves washed away cars and houses and japanese people are devastated. i just want to ask about your personal thoughts and feelings on that. and secondly, you also touched on assistance from the united states to japan. and japanese government said that the japan asked for help from u.s. forces in japan. are you willing to provide those assistance? >> the answer to your second question is, yes. i told prime minister kan we'll provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is the main assistance to provide them is lift capacity. the ability for us to i think help in the cleanup. obviously, when you have a tsunami like this, as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions both in the infrastructure. you have boats and houses and cars that are washed in to main thoroughfares and any assistance
from the people of japan? the special comment coming up. >>> it's hard to believe, but with each passing hour the situation in japan is becoming more dire and dangerous. and today, this. another explosion rips through a nuclear containment building and this, the safety system at a third nuclear reactor within the stricken fukushima plant breaking down. the reactor's fuel rods exposed for more than two hours. and officials seem unable to determine just how much water remains, as they seek to prevent a full-scale meltdown. beyond the dangers surrounding nuclear plant, there's widespread suffering from sendai to tokyo. millions are facing a mull tide of challenge. officials struggling to balance rescue efforts to reach survivors, distribute aid and bury the dead. a thousand bodies washed ashore in the last few hours. search and rescue teams from some 13 countries have now converged on what will be a lengthy and complex operation. frantically working to find any survivors from the upgraded 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami. in all, nearly 10,000 people have been rescued, while ten
for help finding her sister who is a former english teacher in japan who returned to that country the day of the quake. ann found her and helped her reach her sister. >> do you have my sister? >> i have your sister. here she is. >> she is on the phone. are you okay? >> hi. >> are you okay? >> yeah. i'm totally okay. >> let's go right to tokyo now and msnbc's ciz jansing is there live. what's the primary concern now for people across the country? >> reporter: well, i think it's threefold. you have a humanitarian. you have an economic and you have an escalating nuclear crisis. there is nothing simple about what's happening here. and it is affecting not just that northeastern coastal area but really the entire country in a very profound way. now, let's start with the humanitarian crisis. you've been showing those pictures. they are absolutely heartbreaking, devastating. the one town that you showed in miyagi province where as many as a thousand people we heard earlier today washed up on the shore that had been bodies carried away in the tsunami. now officials there are saying they may have a
'm harry smith. also tonight, one week after japan's earthquake and tsunami a big break for the engineers trying to prevent a nuclear meltdown. and kids from around america and haiti, too, do what they can to help the people of japan. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> smith: good evening, katie is on assignment. president obama delivered a warning today to libyan dictator moammar qaddafi: stop slaughtering your people or face military action. the united states will help enforce a no-fly zone approved last night by the u.n. security council, but no american ground troops will be sent to libya. french and british warplanes could be in the air over libya by tomorrow. hours after the u.n. resolution passed, the qaddafi regime declared a cease-fire, but his forces reportedly kept shelling two cities-- misurata and ajdabiya. and there are also reports that qaddafi's forces are headed toward benghazi, the rebels' capital. david martin at the pentagon begins our coverage. david, good evening. >> reporter:
retaliation and destabilization of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality.
. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebelss solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the operation to other nations within days. the president and british prime minister david cameron said qaddafi must go though they insisted he is not a target of the attacks. but a cruise missile attack last night may
and strong allies in japan, as they've come to terms and wrestled with this challenging situation. most of you know that our equipment that we sent over to support them has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people which were in addition to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions and mounted them, one on a fixed-wing aircraft and one on a helicopter and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we've been collecting information as they've come back. we're in the process of sharing that information with our japanese hosts and while that's still being looked at, preliminary indications are that they're consistent with the recommendations that came down from the nuclear regulatory commission. so indications are, it looks like the 50-mile evacuation was prudent. other countries around the world continue to do what they can do support the japanese as they lead this effort to address this challenge. we've had
on the disaster in japan. ten days after those nuclear reactors were damaged by the earthquake and tsunami, a new setback today in the recovery operation. workers were forced again to evacuate when smoke was spotted coming from two of the reactors. the official death toll from the disaster now totals 8,800, nearly 13,000 are still missing. now there are concerns about radiation in japanese pots and in sea water near the plant. bill whitaker has the latest including details about the plant's spotty safety record. >> reporter: it's a sign this crisis is far from under control. ten days after the fukushima plant was knocked out by japan's massive earthquake and tsunami and once again reactor three is spewing smoke a few hours later white smoke from reactor two. it's a mysterious and serious setback, one that prompted workers to evacuate and once again stopped efforts to stabilize the plant. over the weekend, there had been some encouraging signs. plant operators had reconnected electric cables to all six reactors for the first time since the crisis began. and after days of firefighters dousing react
spread to other parts of japan. it does not appear that it poses any threat to either hawaii or territories or the rest of the united states. >>> andrea mitchell just sat down with secretary of state hillary clinton in cairo. what she says about the crisis in japan, the wave of revolutions in the middle east and her surprise stop today in tahrir square. >> it's very exciting and very moving. and to see where this revolution happened and all that it has meantç to the world is extraordinary for me. >>> also this hour, our exclusive with senator kirsten gillibrand. what she's calling on the president to do in terms of ending the war in afghanistan. >>> good day, everybody, i'm nora o'donnell live in washington. andrea's completed interview is straight ahead. >>> we begin with japan. first the human toll. six days after the quake and tsunami, the official figures stand at 4,164 dead. 7,843 missing. the total now more than 12,000. at the fukushima nuclear plant, workers are desperately trying to cool the reactors. two reactors are believed to have been damaged. two more are at r
evacuating americans from japan as danger levels remain high at the crippled nuclear plan this, despite new attempts by military helicopters to cool off the plant's overheated reactors and fuel rods. the top u.s. nuclear regulator says conditions at the plant are much worse than japanese officials say and recommends that americans say 50 miles away. this morning questions about nearly two dozen nuclear reactors with the very same design "early" this thursday morning, march 17th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on a thursday morning. scenes from earlier. military choppers, japanese military helicopters dropping sea water on this nuclear plant a part of the last-ditch effort to bring sea water in ho help cool down the fuel pools and also the nuclear rods there at this facility. >> that is the effort from the sky. also hearing about water cannons on the ground as they try to bring things in there. we are learning this morning that the pentagon is sending in teams to assess the situation and see in a larger military presence may be needed. also
at the pentagon. >>> let's go to japan where fears continue to spread, the death toll continues to client. today marks one week after the massive earthquake and the devastating tsunami which battered the country. 6,911 are confirmed dead and another 10,000 are still missing. survivors across japan observed a moment of silence today at the exact time that the quake struck. many still wearing face masks, many of them still in shock. a lot of the survivors are huddling in nearby shelters. japanese media reporting some 380,000 people in shelters. what makes matters worse, some of the shelters with without power and facing freezing temperatures. some survivors are returning home for the first time since the tsunami like this retired firefighter. he lost his home and entire family. >> translator: my wife, my son's family and four grandchildren. i lost them all. >> as for the nuclear crisis, things are not looking much better in fukushima. japan's nuclear agency raised the crisis level on the damaged planted there. you're looking at it, from a four to a five. that raises it to the same level as three m
rock in new york city. japan is working to contain a humanitarian nuclear and economic crisis. three days after getting hit by a devastating earthquake and tsunami. the pictures still so dramatic. right now, rescue workers are searching for survivors. largely in the country's coastal towns. where this morning, police say the death toll is mounting. in all, more than 10,000 people are estimated dead. millions of residents are still without power, and clean drinking water. the japanese coast is also been struck by more than 100 aftershocks. 150 aftershocks since friday alone. the latest one, a 6.2-magnitude quake followed by a new tsunami scare. only a scare today. safety concerns are lingering over growing problems at nuclear facility. earlier today, 11 people were hurt when a second hydrogen explosion rocked a nuclear plant that sent a column of smoke into the air. that blast was felt 25 miles away. but the plant's operator says radiation levels are fortunately still within the legal limits. >>> meanwhile, the u.s. now says it's moved its ships and aircraft away from one of the quake
>> couric: tonight, two weeks into japan's disaster and it just keeps getting worse. the death toll passes 10,000 and now there may be a breach in one of the nuclear reactors. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the united states may be giving up command of the libya mission, but american forces will still be playing a major role in the operation. the fire that woke up the country to dangers in the workplace. and a population explosion. the colorful comeback of the monarch butterfly. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. japan's prime minister says the nuclear crisis is far from over and the goal right now, he says, is simply to keep it from getting worse. but it did today with a possible breach of one of the reactors. it was two weeks ago that they were damaged when a magnitude nine earthquake shook northern japan and triggered a tsunami. the official death toll passed the 10,000 mark today. 17,000 people are still missing. and now the japanese government has expande
. the nuclear crisis in japan taking a new and potentially dangerous turn today. japan's nuclear safety agency warning the situation at the quake-damaged reactor, that it may not be under control. japanese engineers considering a last-ditch effort to prevent a full-scale meltdown. the government is calling it a race against time to prevent a cat traffic radiation leak that could affect millions of people. priority one, cooling the overheating fuel rods, trying to prevent a massive radiation leak. that may run into problems as well. trace gallagher has more. trace? >> reporter: experts have been saying for days that japan has been downplaying the severity of the crisis. they've upped the crisis from a four to a five. the country is saying they're overwhelmed and calling for the united states to help them stop this crisis. they've gotten some power to reactor 2. the hope is, they can use that power to turn on the cooling pump to get cool water on the reactors and spent fuel rods, but there's a problem. the l.a. times is reporting that nuclear regulatory commission believes the pool holding the s
, will be david gregory's guests. we take you to japan. nuclear crisis getting worse. officials saying they believe there's a breach in the reactor core of unit number three at the damaged fukushima plant. what that means is that more radiation than first thought could be leaking right now. the suspected breach found when two workers were burned whi eed wading into water, 10,000 times more radioactive than normal. there may be a crack in the core or the spent fuel rod pool. all work has since stopped at the plant and japan's prime minister is saying the situation is very grave and the government is not in a position to be optimistic. joining me live from seoul, soesoe soek. >> reporter: good afternoon, as you say, the government did announce today that they -- what they think is happening is there there is a leak. they were cautious not to use the word breach because they're not clear where the source is coming from that affected the workers that you mentioned who were hospitalized yesterday. two of those workers, there were three altogether hospitalized, two of the workers were sent o
concerns about drinking water in japan. the government warning radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant has made tap water unsafe for babies. the u.s. air force bringing in more supplies to help with recovery operations there. >> the military is -- we are here to try and help people. this is a national disaster. we are here to work with the japanese people to start reconstruction and get sendai and other parts of japan's feet on the ground again. bill: the american relief effort includes 13,000 personnel, 20 ships and 140 aircraft. k.t. macfarland said the u.s. military is the first responders to the world. we found that in japan. heather: in the state of nevada, it has the largest share of illegal workers in the country. it also has the highest unemployment rate at 14%. are the illegals making a bad situation worse? anita vogel is joining us from los angeles. tell us about this new report. >> reporter: good morning. it lists the top states with the highest share of illegal immigrants in the labor pool. you mentioned nevada was the number one state with a 10% share of illegal immi
talking about the japan on the effect but now we're adding libya. >> there are so many periods of unrest all over the world but right now, i think wall street is focused on libya. probably it would have ended up higher if we know what was going to happen because a lot of people were afraid to put their money in, not knowing what was going to be happening but it is taking oil off the market. a lot of times when oil is off the market, oil will go up and so will gas prices. what we can expect from wall street is a lot of volatility. we're not going to see up, up or down, down, there are lots of reasons we should take a correction. s&p 500 is well above since december. >> heather: when you see the markets fluctuate according to large events, whether they be domestic or international, what affect does it have if any when you have so many events at once going on? >> the markets are going to be leading indicator, to be a fortune teller in a sense, priced in all of these things. it has been much more reactive of late. but has taken a positive stance toward japan. pretty positive stance to libya.
and bradley manning to the obvious. japan. how officials there ignored alarms about the possibility of a massive quake setting off a nuclear crisis that go back years. are these black swans that keep befalling us truly as unforeseen as everyone would want us to believe? how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com. plus, get the best deal or we'll pay you $1,000. call lending tree at... today. >>> turning our attention to japan, setbacks at the fukushima nuclear plant there. smoke started rising from reactor three amid fresh concerns about food and water supplies in the area. residents being warned not to drink the tap water and the government has banned shipments of milk and spinach from the region after radiation was detected but could all of this have been prevented? this man had been warnin
into an end game that doesn't overcommit us when we're already committed now? we've got this crisis in japan we're trying to help with, etc. so we are stretched thin. >> reporter: general and michael, thank you very much. >> thanks, shannon. >>> well, a leading figure of the libyan opposition movement has released a statement praising coalition forces for military action against qaddafi's regime. ththe pribs's family prince's fd from libya after the coup said the international community should help libya move forward. he said the libyan people cry out to the world to champion their rally for freedom and democracy. steve harrigan and rick leventhal have been provided around the clock coverage. steve was on the air as air strikes hit the area. you can follow that and catch all the developments in libya as military action continues. just log onto foxnews.com. >>> well, a glimmer of hope in such a tragic story in japan. an 80-year-old woman and a teenage boy were rescued from the wreckage of a house in northeastern japan nine days after a devastating earthquake and tsunami. both of them were wea
reactors at japan's krip crippled nuclear plant temperature. they say there is still a lot of work to be done before electricity can be turned on. emergency crews dumped 18 tons of seawater into a nearly boiling pool holding spent nuclear fuel. japan's nikkei market closed with more than a 4% gain today thanks to the good news at the power plant. the index is still 7% lower than its close the day the earthquake and tsunami hit. >>> crews recovered the body of taylor anderson, an american teaching english in miyagi, japan, believed to be the first american victim, the first known one of the quake and tsunami. they estimate miyagi prefecture lost 15,000 people. >>> nbc's lee cowan is live now in seoul, south of korea. what's the story now? what's the situation with fear and whether it is dissipating in that region? >> reporter: i think there is still a lot of fear, it depends on where you are. if you are talking in the north, you are still focused so much on the search and rescue effort. it is still officially search and rescue. they go through the rebel with sticks trying their best
unfolding, japan. there's new radiation showing up in food and water in the aftermath of the tsunami, the earthquake. much more of our coverage from japan. we'll have a live report and from libya when we come back. and here's what we did today: we put almost three million americans to work... ...adding nearly 400 billion dollars to the economy. generated over two and a half million kilowatts of electricity... ...enough energy to power a quarter of america. we gave your kids a cleaner ride to school. kept the lights on during a calm day at the wind farm. heated 57 million u.s. homes. simmered grandma's chicken noodle soup. melted tons of recycled glass. roasted millions of coffee beans. provided electricity for nearly 29 million home computers. heated your bathwater. cooked your takeout. lit your way home. we helped america import less of its energy. cleared the air by burning cleaner than other fuel sources, with less pollutants and no mercury. and tomorrow, we could do even more. we're cleaner, domestic, abundant and ready now. we're america's natural gas. the smarter power today. l
're expecting that announcement at 3:00 eastern time. >>> still touch and go at japan's nuclear power plant, but they're still structure ally sound. smoke started rising from reactor numbers two and three. the smoke eventually stopped. the plant operator says it's not clear what started the smoke in the first place. >>> the just is making potassium iodide to u.s. personnel in tokyo and abu ghraib, trophy pictures of soldiers posing with bodies of afghan civiliance. what possibly could the military say to explain it? >>> plus it's a list no parent wants to see their teen's name on. and the latest case of cyber bullying. >>> a dramatic rescue of an entire family including a six month old puppy. [ sneezes ] allergies? you think i have allergies? you're sneezing. i'm allergic to you. doubtful, you love me. hey, you can't take allegra with fruit juice. what? yeah, it's on the label. really? here, there's nothing about juice on the zyrtec® label. what? labels are meant to be read. i'd be lost without you. i knew you weren't allergic to me. [ sneezes ] you know, you can't take allegra with orange
at some point. thank you, william bratton for joiningus. >> can japan import enough bottled water to ease fears of nuclear contamination? >>> open court. chris brown says he's sorry about his latest outburst, but could his morning meltdown land him behind bars? >>> time for the "your business" entrepreneur of the week. beach volley players turned their passion into a year-round activity. they created the sand box in mystic, connecticut, the only indoor volleyball facility in new england. they're attracting players around the reege to this unique concept. watch "your business" sunday mornings 7:30 on msnbc. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] with amazing innovation, driven by relentless competition, wireless puts the world at your command. ♪ wireless puts the world at your command. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [scraping] [piano keys banging] [scraping] [horns honking] iteelie's holdyourarack. let me guess, 16. [laughing] yeeah. that's why there's castrol gtx... w
much. >> thank you, andrea. >>> now to the latest to the crisis in japan. police there say the official death toll now has reached 9,800 people. 17,500 people still remain missing. two workers are trying to stabilize the fukushima nuclear power plant, two of those workers were injured when they stepped into radioactive water and were hospitalized, but authorities say that they were exposed to levels below the maximum allowed for plant workers. >>> the u.s. military has more than 19,000 marines and sailors, 20 ships, 140 aircrafts assisting with relief efforts in japan. and in a surprise move, north korea is helping out as well. kim jong-il has sent $500,000 million for relief for ethnic koreans living in japan. >>> today, tokyo's drinking water has been deemed safe again, a day after radiation levels sent many scrambling for bottled water. but some of the neighboring communities around tokyo are now reporting increased radiation levels. nbc' lee cowan is live for us in so seoul, south korea. the improvement, a day forward -- one step forward, two steps back. it seems not only the radiat
't the case. after the break, the latest on the nuclear fall-out in japan. host: could switching to geico really save you 15% or more on car insurance? host: do dogs chase cats? ♪ 70's era music sfx: tires squealing ♪ 70's era music sfx: tires squealing vo: geico. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. >> bret: u.s. says contained structure at three rekors at the nuclear plant are intact. greg palkot is in osaka japan, with the latest. hello. >> reporter: that is good news from the nuclear regulatory commission in the united states and they say the situation is on the "verge of stabilizing," but there are set-backs. plumes of smoke on monday coming from two reactors. evacuation of workers, pickup in radiation. that appears to have dissipated. also electricity is hooked up to the reactors but what was feared is being found. machinery inside is damaged. the parts are going to be needed before any cooling pumps are started up. [ inaudible ] the government says there is no danger but they are looking further. traces found in tap water or elsewhere, the radiation fears are
following general recommendations from the japan nuclear safety commission. >> we'll continue to follow it. >>> joining me to assess the situation in japan, nuclear fph frank von hippel. officials revealing a suspected breach in the reactor at the fukushima plant. this could mean a much more serious radioactive contamination that may be we haven't known so far exactly what's go on behind those walls there. but is it time to give up this battle, about cooling reactors and follow the lead in what they did in chernobyl, and that is to shut the plant down completely? >> no, they don't have the option of shutting it down. chernobyl was a very different situation. the core basically blew itself. a lot of the core blew into the atmosphere, and the rest melted down into the ground. and then they -- after a while they built this so-called sarcophagus to close it off. there's too much energy coming out of the fuel to walk away. they still have to keep trying to cool it. the problem is that we're now two weeks after the accident started and they haven't -- they don't have a handle on the situation ye
in japan. workers get another scare as smoke rises, once again, from that crippled nuclear plant and residents are now being warned about contaminated drinking water and food. this as the estimated death toll jumps to more than 18,000 "early" this monday morning, jumps to more than 18,000 "early" this monday morning, march 21st, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on a monday morning, i'm chris wragge. >> i'm erica hill. >> following two very major stories this morning. first of which the situation in japan. all eyes on that nuclear facility in fukushima once again. this as reports as i mention a few moments ago, smoke emanating from that troubled reactor 3 there. and now reports of radiation levels detected radiation levels in both the food and the water in that safety zone around the nuclear plant right now. we're going to continue to follow this and have an update on the situation there in the coming moments. >> you mentioned two major stories. the other one, of course, that we are following is happening in libya. for a second
? >>> japan's radiation fears. a run on water and basic supplies in tokyo and at the crippled nuclear plant, workers sent to the hospital from exposure to beta rays. >>> and washington, we have a problem. the strange case of two ssenger jets forc to lan on ei oat d.c. mor rpt when no one answered at air traffic control. we'll have the latest on the investigation, just ahead. >>> good morning, everyone. it's thursday, march 24th, 2011. i'm savannah guthrie. chuck todd will be back tomorrow. also this morning, the president getting it from the right and the left in congress on libya, as he wakes up this morning back in washington. and we will talk to the libyan ambassador to the u.s., who left the gadhafi regime live here on "the daily rundown" later this hour. >>> also, the slow start to the 2012 republican race seems to be helping one candidate -- president obama. we'll have the latest poll. >>> but let's get to the rundown. and we'll start in libya, where a more complicated and potentially more dangerous phase of the military effort has begun. coalition war planes are now attacking gadhafi
nuclear plant in japan after water inside tested 10,000 times more radioactive than normal. and this morning officials are expanding the voluntary evacuation zone. we'll have the latest in a live report. >>> wake-up call. the f.a.a. suspends a veteran tower controller after he fell asleep during his overnight shift at reagan national airport. it could lead to major safety changes nationwide. >>> final wish. elizabeth taylor laid to rest during an emotional private service and at her request she arrived fashionably late. one last grand entrance for a hollywood legend today, friday sh mar, hollywood legend today, friday sh mar, march 25, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> and good morning. welcome to "today" on a friday morning. i'm mcalistatt lauer. >> i'm ann curry. just a short time ago japan's prime minister delivered an address to his nation issuing an apology to farmers and businesses damaged by the nuclear crisis. he's been thanking the so-called fukushima 50r, the workers who stayed inside the plant trying to cool the reactors. >> the most recent
on the attac >>> setback. just hours after officials reporting progress at the nuclear plant in japan. smoke rising from the reactor forced them to evacuate again. this as japan halts shipments of milk and vegetables near the site over fears of contamination. >>> and a female wing walker fighting for her life after her husband was forced to crash land the airplane. he speaks about her condition today, monday march 21, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. busy monday morning. i'm matt lauer. ann curry is back from japan, in for meredith. what an extra job you did over that on what had to be a difficult trip. >> it was difficult for everyone involved. i think we are all thinking of the people that are still there and especially there japanese. we'll have the latest from japan including the latest evacuation of the workers from the nuclear power plant and also the detection of radiation on spinach and milk coming up, matt. >> also ahead the u.s. army is issuing an apology for disturbing photos that portray abuse allegedly
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